lamarghe73:

Ashol Pan.

13 year old Ashol Pan is one of the estimated last 250 Mongolian eagle hunters left in the world. And one of the very few women that are granted the privilege to be trained in this ancient, traditional hunting method. Golden eagles are used mainly to hunt foxes during the winter months.

Some images courtesy of Caters News Agency.

(via caecilius12)

human

Duo, a Gobelins animated short

Janis Ausel, Elsa Boyer, Marie-Pierre Demessant, Dorian Lee, Laurent Moing, Guitty Mojabi, Aron Bothman

animation short film

jeremysorese:

For those living in the Chicago area, I have an exhibition up at the Harold Washington library from now until March. My comic Love Me Forever! Oh! Oh! Oh! was originally published by 2DCloud and then again in The Best American Comics 2013 is now online three years after I made it. There are of course things I would change if I could but here is how it’ll stay, direct from my 23 year old brain. 

Recently a friend joked that with the summer I just had I could make a sequel to this comic and hardly change a thing. My little brother got married back in June in a barn on a goat farm in Virginia and three months later a friend from High School also got married in a barn on a goat farm in Virginia. I went stag to both. Three years later and marriage still feels like an impossible dream and I’m still not very good at dating. 

But, then again, if in 2014 I’m brave enough to ask a guy out who just happened to be sitting alone in a park on a Friday afternoon then that is more than enough to prove to me that I’m not that same overwhelmed kid working in a grocery in Chicago. A distinction that can be hard to remember and a distinction that I all too often forget. And definitely one I couldn’t imagine as a 23 year old. 

(Also, shout out to Marnie Galloway for being my photographer! )

comics

misslucid:

I’ve been meaning to do this for awhile since I’ve gotten so many people asking me what I use to make Avialae. I say *toolbox* but really these are just the pens I use to ink this specific comic with…I have…so many pens…

There are captions with the images explaining the tools.

01. Kuretake Disposable Pocket Brush Pen - Extra Fine
I use this pen the most. It makes a nice clean line that doesn’t budge with water.

02. Kuretake Disposable Pocket Brush Pen - Medium
Same as #01, but a much bigger tip—good for filling in blacks.

03. Uni Pin Pen 02
I use this pen the second most. I like a finer line and more control when inking faces and smaller details, so this does the trick for that.

04. Uni Pin Pen 01
For the tiny tiny details.

05. Kuretake No. 40 Fountain Sable Hair Brush Pen
I don’t use this pen much for this comic but it’s my favorite to ink with. I use it more for larger illustrations.

06. Pilot Color Eno .07mm - Soft Blue
My dedicated bluelines pencil! I like the Eno lead because it doesn’t break easily when I draw with my meaty claws.

07. Uni-ball Signo White Gel Pen
For fuckups and cutting back into lines. (This is not waterproof, so I usually use this last.)

08. Kuretake Fudebiyori Pocket Color Brush Pen - Light Gray
I use this for freckles. That’s it. That’s the only purpose.

09. Kuretake Fudejokochi Brush Pen - Gray Ink
Darker freckles.

10. Akashiya Sai Watercolor Brush Pen - Mouse Gray
T
his pen is kinda cool b/c you can dip it in water and it acts as a pigmented watercolor pen. Of course I blindly disregard that and use it as a base for darker gray fills.

11. Pentel Brush Pen w/ Gray Ink Cartridge
Similar to the Akashiya, but it doesn’t react with water as much.

12. Pentel Aquash Watercolor Brush Pen - Light Black
Dark gray fills/darker shadows.

13. Sumo Grip .5mm Mechanical Pencil
I don’t use this so much with Avialae, but I do all my sketching with this chunky ass mechanical pencil. It’s easier to hold??? Idk. It’s blue.

14. Uni Boxy Eraser
Yooo this eraser is awesome. It erases even my blue lines and it doesn’t leave an obscene amount of eraser shit.

15. J. Herbin Fountain Pen Ink - Gris Nuage
Gray ink! I use this in combination with my waterbrush pens to do most of the values in Avialae. It layers nicely and using gray ink helps me from making values too dark.

16. Kuretake Waterbrush - Medium
You fill these with water and squeeze them to keep the brush wet. I keep this one clean to do light values.

17. Kuretake Waterbrush - Large
I fill this one with diluted gray ink to do darker values.

18. Kuretake Waterbrush - Flat Head
Big ‘ol waterbrush to do big washes with.

I also do a lot of editing in Photoshop b/c I do most of Avialae while on a large amount of sleep medication*~*~*~

(via xxrandomidiotxx)

art supplies process

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com

(via hoganddice)

race